Good Old Days Updates

SELECT AN ISSUE:
In the Good Old Days Antiques Corner This Week in History
In the Good Old Days


Trivia Question

Trivia Question: What fictitious city did the Cleaver family call home in the TV show Leave It to Beaver?


Flower Power

Click here for larger image.
credit: Charles Brutlag/shutterstock.com

It's September. Summer went by in a flash, didn't it? My summer project to-do list is missing many check marks. I am not looking forward to the temperature decline. And I am certainly not ready to give up my bare-feet-and-no-jacket lifestyle just yet. But I am ready to stop watering all my outdoor plants and flowers!

My grandma Eleanora had a green thumb. As a small child, I remember admiring her flower beds, so full of color and variety. Even after she had to move from her expansive farm to a small home in town and was beset with crippling arthritis, she maintained lovely gardens and flower beds. My mom inherited Grandma's penchant for flowers, and to this day, as an 86-year-old gardener, she loves puttering around in her flower beds more than anything else. She has always been able to casually compose the prettiest combinations of blooms and foliage with seemingly little effort and no planning whatsoever. She just finds something she likes and plops it next to something else. She doesn't cater to any high-maintenance plants. "If it doesn't survive, it wasn't meant to be in my garden," I've heard her say many times. Yet year after year, her beds produce glorious displays.

My thumb is not so green, but I enjoy the challenge. Every spring I load up on annuals and perennials, and then go to work enhancing my landscaping. All summer long I water and weed and tend my investment. But by the end of August, I come down with what I call Floral Fatigue, a condition that never infected my mom or grandma. I grow tired of the daily watering, the nonstop weeding and the incessant mosquito swatting. I'm done with the hoes, hoses and horseflies. By Labor Day, my pots of annuals are chucked into the garbage with no mercy. Sorry, Grandma.

But I know come spring my DNA will stir and my thoughts will once again turn to beautiful blooms. I will buy and plant all kinds of flowers that remind me of my mom and my grandma, and I will continue the tradition that links us together. And even though I will lose interest by the end of summer, I will have succeeded in bridging three generations of floral passion. That's the power of flowers and the power of family traditions.

'Til next time,

Mary Beth Weisenburger,
Good Old Days® magazine

PS. What hobby or interest did you inherit from a parent or grandparent? We want to hear about it! Send a brief response to me at Editor@GoodOldDaysMagazine.com, and it could appear in a future update or in Good Old Days magazine!


Mary Beth Weisenburger has been with Annie's since April 2011. She has 25 years of experience in the marketing, advertising and publishing fields. In addition to her job as editor of Good Old Days, she has been writing a family humor column for over a decade. She and her husband, two college-age kids, two dogs and various other critters live on five acres in the country, where she enjoys reading on the back porch, refinishing furniture, feeding the birds and digging in the dirt of her perennial gardens.


Fill out the easy feedback form and let me know your thoughts, questions and ideas.



Trivia Answer

Mayfield. Leave It to Beaver was a family comedy that appeared on television from 1957 to 1963. The Cleaver family included Hugh Beaumont as Ward, the dad; Barbara Billingsley as June, the mom; Tony Dow as Wally, the eldest son; and Jerry Mathers as Theodore, "The Beaver," the youngest son.

Find out more about the fashion, events and popular culture of America in the Live It Again book series at LiveItAgain.com, featuring the best of The Saturday Evening Post!

Get a FREE issue of Good Old Days magazine
just for giving it a try! (A $5.99 value, FREE!)
Good Old Days
The magazine that remembers the best.

Good Old Days magazine is the magazine that remembers the best of times. Feature stories and photos of the good old days of 1930 through 1960 are all contributed by readers. This easy-to-read collection of memories will fascinate the young and the old alike.

Good Old Days
YES! Please send me my FREE ISSUE of Good Old Days magazine and start my subscription. If I like my free issue, I'll simply pay the attached invoice and get one full year (6 more issues) for only $15.97 plus $2.98 delivery. That's one issue FREE and six more as part of my subscription! In the unlikely event that I'm not pleased with my free issue, I'll return the invoice marked "cancel" and keep that issue as your gift to me -- and owe absolutely nothing.
First Name:
Last Name:
Address:
Address 2:
City:
State:
ZIP Code:
Email:
Don't miss out! Get email alerts about your new magazine subscription, special offers and savings from Good Old Days and Annie's. Questions? Read our online privacy pledge.

Offer valid in U.S. only!
Canadian Orders
Give a Gift Subscription!Give a Gift Subscription!